Morse Code Communicate with Dits and Dahs

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Morse code, an intriguing and straightforward method of communication, is a series of electronic pulses separated by a definite pause. Many argue that Morse code is a binary code; however, there is a fair share of people who believe that it uses three different parameters to be decodable, hence making it a tertiary system. The two pulses, namely dit(.) a short pulse, and dah(-) a long pulse is separated by a time gap that is essential for decoding the letters and separating words sent/received via Morse code.

The code was designed by Samuel F.B. Morse during the 1840s while working on his invention in the telegraph, a method to effectively communicate over long distances using electromagnetism principles. During the mid-1800s, this technology of representing letters and numbers with dits and dahs became prevalent and was known as the International Morse Code. The code slightly differs with the American Standard of Morse code.

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How it all started?

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There are quite a few tales about the origin of Morse code, out of which one story says,  Samuel went to a printer’s shop and counted the amount of printer type the printer had for each of the alphabets. Then after a series of careful investigation, Samuel associated frequency of occurrence to the alphabets. The shortest Morse Codes, dit(.) and dah(-) represented the most frequently occurring English alphabets, E and T. Likewise, least frequent letters such as Y and J got longer Morse Codes. Numbers from 0-9 and punctuations also received more extended representations without having differentiation on the case of the alphabets.

Where is it used?

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If you’ve watched a good-old spy movie or documentaries related to military, you’ll find wireless data sent via Morse Code. Text messages can are sent reliably amidst all the noise involving transmission. In today’s era, it is used by amateur radio operators to some extent, and landline telegraphers, military radio operators, are seen using Morse Code for communication.

The code is available in numerous forms for easy memory. The most commonly referred way to easily decipher the system is the Morse Tree:

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